Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10524/22919

Survival of Juvenile Silver Pomfret, Pampus argenteus, Kept in Transport Conmditions in Different Densities and Temperatures

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Title: Survival of Juvenile Silver Pomfret, Pampus argenteus, Kept in Transport Conmditions in Different Densities and Temperatures
Authors: Peng, Shiming
Chen, Xuezhong
Shi, Zhaohong
Yin, Fei
Sun, Peng
LC Subject Headings: Fish culture--Israel--Periodicals.
Fish culture--Periodicals.
Aquaculture--Israel--Periodicals.
Aquaculture--Periodicals.
Issue Date: 2012
Publisher: Israeli Journal of Aquaculture - BAMIGDEH
Citation: Shiming Peng, Xuezhong Chen, Zhaohong Shi, Fei Yin, Peng Sun. (2012). Survival of Juvenile Silver Pomfret, Pampus argenteus, Kept in Transport Conmditions in Different Densities and Temperatures. The Israeli Journal of Aquaculture - Bamidgeh, 64, 6 pp.
Series/Report no.: The Israeli Journal of Aquaculture - Bamidgeh
Abstract: Optimum conditions for the transportation of juvenile silver pomfret, Pampus argenteus (Euphrasen 1788) were investigated under simulated conditions. Juveniles (5.22±1.09 g) were kept in 10-l plastic bags containing oxygen and 3 l water at 15, 20, and 25°C in (a) low loading densities (5, 10, 20 g/l) for 8 h and (b) high loading densities (20, 30, 40 g/l) for 4 h. Following simulations, water was sampled to measure dissolved oxygen, pH, and total ammonia. Both survival rates and dissolved oxygen levels decreased when the temperature and loading density increased; pH decreased significantly under all transportation conditions. High loading density (30-40 g/l) and temperature (25°C) resulted in high total ammonia and mortality (54-64%). The ideal temperature for transporting juvenile silver pomfret in plastic bags was 15°C. At this temperature, the highest survival rate was recorded, even at loading densities of 40 g/l. Transport at high temperature (25°C) and loading density (20 g/l) should not exceed 8 h, due to raised mortality (>30%) and ammonia levels.
Pages/Duration: 6 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10524/22919
ISSN: 0792-156X
Appears in Collections:Volume 64, 2012



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