Works by Shaku Soen

Kōgaku Sōen 洪嶽宗演・洪岳宗演 (1860–1919) was known during his lifetime as Shaku Sōen 釋宗演・釈宗演 and his "chamber name" as a teacher (rōshi) was Ryōgakutsu 楞伽窟. He gained notoriety not only as a teacher in the Rinzai denomination of Zen and abbot of the Engakuji monastery, but through his role of chief of the Japanese delegation in the 1893 World's Parliament of Religions in Chicago. Subsequently, Suzuki Daisetsu Teitarō 鈴木大拙貞太郎 (1870–1966), one his disciples, lived in the United States and worked with Paul Carus (1852–1919) at the Open Court Publishing Company. Part of the correspondance between Sōen and Carus subsists.

For further information about Sōen, see:

  • Mohr, Michel. 2010. The Use of Traps and Snares: Shaku Sōen Revisited. In Zen Masters, edited by Steven Heine, and Dale Stuart Wright. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 183–216.
  • Auerback, Micah. 2012. A Closer Look at Zen at War: The Battlefield Chaplaincy of Shaku Soen in the Russo-Japanese War (1904–1905). In Buddhism and Violence: Militarism and Buddhism in Modern Asia, edited by Vladimir Tikhonov, and Torkel Brekke. New York: Routledge, pp. 152–171.

Concerning Carus, see:

  • Henderson, Harold. 1993. Catalyst for Controversy: Paul Carus of Open Court. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.

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