Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10524/52372

A Community-Based Teacher Career Ladder

Item Summary

Title: A Community-Based Teacher Career Ladder
Authors: Takeno, LaurieAnn
Keywords: Teacher Turnover
Community-Based Teachers
Teacher Career Ladder
Issue Date: 28 Sep 2016
Abstract: This presentation highlights the impact teacher turnover in our HIDOE schools is having on education and socioeconomics for 96792 residents. Three reasons are suggested for why education & income statistics in N-W is lower than the state average: (1) chronic high teacher turnover in our schools lays a poor foundation for educational success; (2) pronounced student-teacher cultural mismatch sets teachers and students up for failure; (3) the current teacher career ladder is not community-based.
Description: This presentation highlights the impact teacher turnover in our DOE schools is having on education and socioeconomics for 96792 residents. Three reasons are suggested for why education & income statistics in N-W is lower than the state average: (1) chronic high teacher turnover in our schools lays a poor foundation for educational success; (2) pronounced student-teacher cultural mismatch sets teachers and students up for failure; (3) the current teacher career ladder is not community-based. Demographic and socio-economic data on Nānākuli-Wai‘anae (N-W) schools provide compelling reason to invest in Nānākuli-Wai‘anae community members to become teachers in the N-W DOE schools rather than recruit from outside community. Currently the demographic of N-W school teachers do not match the demographic of N-W students, largely in part due to a teacher career ladder that does not support someone from community and costly ineffective recruitment efforts. The current teacher career ladder is designed for someone for a second plus generation college student from a mid- to high-income background that does not match the socioeconomic status of the N-W community. We need to start investing in solutions that reflect the community demographic and not allow socioeconomic status to become a barrier to becoming a teacher in N-W schools. We need the community advocate for community-based solutions, and this presentation is opening the conversation to begin/revive these efforts.
Pages/Duration: 19 slides
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10524/52372
Rights: An error occurred on the license name.
Appears in Collections:Huliko‘a Kaiāulu Scholar Speaker Series



Items in eVols are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.