Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10524/53429

Prevalence of physical activity levels by ethnicity among adults in Hawaii, BRFSS 2001.

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Title: Prevalence of physical activity levels by ethnicity among adults in Hawaii, BRFSS 2001.
Authors: Mampilly, Carrie M
Yore, Michelle M
Maddock, Jay E
Nigg, Claudio R
Buchner, David
show 1 moreHeath, Gregory W
show less
Issue Date: Oct 2005
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Few studies have examined the differences in physical activity levels between subgroups of Asian or Pacific Islanders living in the United States. This study compared levels of physical activity for three subgroups of Asian or Pacific Islanders residing in Hawaii. METHODS: Data on Native Hawaiian/Part Native Hawaiian (N=585), Filipino (N=548), Japanese (N=871), and White (N=1728) adults were obtained from the Hawaii 2001 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), which contained more detailed questions on ethnicity than are collected by most states. Six physical activity categories were compared: inactive, insufficient (some activity but less than recommended activity), moderate activity (> or = 30 minutes of moderate activity > or = 5 days a week), vigorous activity (> or = 20 minutes of vigorous activity > or = 3 days a week), recommended activity (meeting either moderate or vigorous activity requirements), and a recently suggested target of > or = 60 minutes of moderate activity 7 days a week or > or = 20 minutes of vigorous activity > or = 4 days a week. RESULTS: Among Asians or Pacific Islanders, Native Hawaiians/Part Native Hawaiians were most active (38.9% moderate and 23.9% vigorous), followed by Japanese (32.1%, 20.4%) and Filipinos (31.8%, 18.6%). Whites were more active than any of these three subgroups (47.2%, 35.4%). CONCLUSIONS: Differences in physical activity levels between subgroups of Asians or Pacific Islanders in Hawaii suggests that aggregated data for all subgroups obscures important information about disparities in activity levels. State efforts to reduce disparities in activity levels should take into account differences between Asian or Pacific Islander subgroups.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10524/53429
ISSN: 0017-8594
Appears in Collections:Hawaii Medical Journal Articles For 2005



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