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How Hawaii's doctors feel about physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia: an overview.

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Title: How Hawaii's doctors feel about physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia: an overview.
Authors: Siaw, L K
Tan, S Y
Issue Date: Dec 1996
Abstract: We polled, by questionnaire, all doctors and medical trainees in Hawaii (n = 3,017) to determine their attitudes towards physician-assisted suicide, euthanasia and other end-of-life medical issues. One thousand and twenty-eight (34.1%) responded. Medical trainees did not differ significantly from practicing physicians. Only a minority of respondents (15.6%) were willing to assist a terminally-ill patient to commit suicide. An even smaller number (9.8) would perform active euthanasia. On the other hand, an overwhelming majority would withhold (97.6%) or withdraw (78.6%) life-support upon request. Most doctors (88.0%) were also willing to administer high doses of narcotics for pain relief, even if such therapy hastened death. About half the doctors felt that physician-assisted suicide and active euthanasia may be justified under some circumstances, although most were unwilling to personally carry out these acts. Catholic, Filipino and Hawaiian/Polynesian doctors were statistically less likely to approve of or perform physician-assisted suicide or active euthanasia.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10524/54078
ISSN: 0017-8594
Appears in Collections:Hawaii Medical Journal Articles For 1996



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