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The secondary bacterial infection caused by WSSV outbreaks impacts shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus’ growth as well as its intestinal microbiota’s composition and function

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dc.contributor.author He, Zihao
dc.contributor.author Zhao, Jichen
dc.contributor.author Liao, Xuzheng
dc.contributor.author Chen, Xieyan
dc.contributor.author Fu, Zhibin
dc.contributor.author Sun, Chengbo
dc.contributor.author Ni, Zuotao
dc.date.accessioned 2021-03-29T17:31:56Z
dc.date.available 2021-03-29T17:31:56Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.issn 0792-156X
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10524/63813
dc.description.abstract Intestinal microbiota homeostasis is a complex ecosystem and is essential for promoting aquatic animals’ growth. Invading pathogens can cause dynamical composition and structure change in the hosts’ microbiota due to this affecting their functions. WSSV is one of the most common and dangerous shrimp pathogens, which leads to white spot disease with too high mortality. A few studies on shrimp intestinal microbiota mainly focused on the changes during acute infection stage. Marsupenaeus japonicus is one of the most cultured shrimp with a decent ability to cope with environmental changes. In the current research, using M. japonicus as a model, we compared the differences of intestinal microbiota between healthy shrimp and the shrimp that survived through the WSSV outbreak. Our study showed that compared to the healthy M. japonicus, the WSSV outbreak disrupted intestinal microbiota structure in the survived shrimp: There was less potential beneficial bacteria and more harmful bacteria. Furthermore, the diversity and total abundance of intestinal microbiota in WSSV-survived shrimp increased significantly. On top of that, a metagenomic analysis by PICRUSt suggested that the changed intestinal microbiota could help the host to combat the secondary bacterial infections caused by WSSV outbreaks by regulating cell growth and death, reducing cell motility, improving energy metabolism, and increasing intestinal enzyme activities regardless the smaller sizes of WSSV-survived shrimp. This could be a result of excessive energy consumption and reduced nutrient-absorbing intestinal microbiota. Our study indicated that shrimp intestinal microbiota plays a fundamental role in combating against secondary infections and regulating the hosts’ growth post WSSV outbreaks. The eventual goal is to development of more efficient diagnostics and therapeutic strategies.
dc.format.extent 17 pages
dc.relation.ispartof The Israeli Journal of Aquaculture - Bamidgeh
dc.subject marsupenaeus japonicus
dc.subject wssv
dc.subject intestinal microbiota
dc.subject growth performance
dc.subject secondary bacterial infections
dc.subject immunity strategy
dc.subject shrimp
dc.subject metagenomics
dc.subject diagnostics
dc.subject bacteria
dc.title The secondary bacterial infection caused by WSSV outbreaks impacts shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus’ growth as well as its intestinal microbiota’s composition and function
dc.type Article
dc.type.dcmi Text
prism.volume 72
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.46989/001c.21687
Appears in Collections: Volume 72, 2020


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