Rights, Rites, and Riots: Values of Resources and Research in Hawaiian Archaeology

Date
06/01/07 12:00 AM
Authors
Carson, Mike T.
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11
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1
Starting Page
77
Ending Page
82
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Abstract
As in many regions, Hawaiian archaeological resources are becoming increasingly recognized as valuable by a variety of stake-holders, yet the perceived value of archaeological research is somehow out-ranked by other potential values of the same resources. Artifacts, sites, and other resources are accepted as important for cultural meaning, general appreciation, and responsible management. Potential scientific value is generally recognized, but it is not always understood to be significant. Meanwhile, the practice of archaeology is viewed as a costly nuisance, an unwanted intrusion into the past, and a self-serving trivial hobby. Clearly, archaeologists need to improve the perceived value of their research as a significant and desirable contribution.
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resource management, resource stake-holders, archaeological research, data recovery
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6 pages
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